He Rangatira Leaders

Recognised for their contributions, service, vision, dedication and expertise towards constructive change and improvement to Māori health. We invite you to explore the Maori leaders who influence and contribute to Māori health and wellbeing.

Be inspired. Aspire.

Joanna Hikaka

Ngāruahine

Dr Joanna Hikaka is a clinical pharmacist and health researcher focusing on equitable access to health services for Māori and developing anti-racist health services.

Kiriana Bird

Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Tukorehe

Dr Kiriana Bird is passionate about health, equity and Māori wellbeing.

Dr Mataroria Lyndon

Ngāti Hine, Ngāti Wai, Ngāti Whātua, Waikato

Mataroria credits Te Reo and tikanga Māori as his tūāpapa - the foundation of his identity and successes.

Egan Bidois

Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāiterangi, Te Arawa

Egan Bidois advocates for users of mental health services and is passionate about helping those in their most vulnerable times. He believes it is a blessing to assist those experiencing times of mental distress.

Riana Manuel

Ngāti Pukenga, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Kahungunu

Riana strongly believes that we must change now so that our tamariki and mokopuna have a better future.

Dr Vicki Macfarlane FRNZCGP, FAChAM, is a dedicated GP and addiction medicine specialist who strongly emphasises providing quality medical care with compassion and kindness.

Leilani Maraku

Ngāti Raukawa

Leilani Maraku develops and delivers Kaupapa Māori Mental Health & Addiction peer support services throughout the Manawatū region for adults, youth, and their whānau.

Kaniwa Kupenga-Tamarama

Ngāti Porou,Ngāti Maui, Ngāti Hikairo, Ngāti Apakura

As a midwife, Kaniwa Kupenga-Tamarama is passionate about supporting women in their most vulnerable, intimate, and sacred moments.

Alisha Tamepo-Pehi

Ngāti Porou, Ngāpuhi

As a nurse, Alisha Tamepo-Pehi is passionate about making a real difference in families through her mental health mahi.

Te Rangimaria Warbrick

Rangitāne, Ngāti Rangitihi

Te Rangimaria passion arises from his lived experience of addiction and the importance of including Māori cultural imperatives in delivering addiction support services in our communities.